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Ultimate Spider-Man #23 Review

Written by on May 19, 2013
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews, Marvel Reviews  |  No Comments »

Ultimate Spider-Man #23

 
Rating: 4/5
Publisher Name: Marvel Comics
Publisher Website: www.marvel.com
Writer: Brian Michael Bendis
Artist: Dave Marquez
Colorist: Justin Ponsor
Number of Pages: 22
Price: 3.99
Safety Content Label: Teen

 

“Spider-Man No More”

Publisher Blurb:

Will tragedy force Miles to quit?! Bombshell is back! An all new Cloak and Dagger!!!

Reviewers Comments:

Remember when there was a bit of a controversy in the press about Miles Morales taking over the mantle of Spider-Man from Peter Parker? Yeah, me neither. Almost two-years removed from the debut of the current incarnation of Ultimate Spider-Man and if there’s one thing that is evident, Miles isn’t a replacement or stop gap Spider-Man, he is truly the Ultimate Spider-Man. And in the grand Spider-Man tradition, Miles has recently dealt with a tragedy with the lose of his (add spoiler material here) at the hands of Venom.

After the recent issues that Miles has had to deal with during the recently concluded ‘Venom War’, issue #23 is a palette cleaner. Issue #23 picks up one year removed from issue #22 and an older Miles has held true to his word (as well as the title of the storyline) and stayed out of the spandex and spider mask. After all the action were the previous issues, #23 pumps the brakes and focuses on Miles and his relationships (which are the hallmark of any quality Spider-Man series) with his best friend Ganke, his girlfriend Katie Bishop (a name that should be familiar to readers of the 616 Marvel Universe), his father as well as Jessica Drew (Spider-Woman).

As usual, the art of Dave Marquez is spectacular. From page one, panel one, it’s apparent that not only is Miles a bit older, but due to the events of issue #22, he’s a changed young man. There’s a fury, an anger within Miles which is eerily similar to his 616 counterpart. Marquez’s art, coupled with Bendis’s script adds up to an issue that maybe like on costumes but high on drama.

Overall, I look forward seeing if and how an older Miles decides to don the Spider-Man identity once more; however, if it takes him several issues to reclaim his mantle it won’t necessarily be such a bad thing for the reader.




Batman and Red Robin #19 Review

Written by on Apr 15, 2013
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews, DC Comics Reviews  |  No Comments »

Batman and Red Robin #19

Rating: 4/5
Publisher Name: DC Comics
Publisher Website: www.dccomics.com
Writer: Peter J. Tomasi
Artist: Patrick Gleason
Colorist: John Kalisz
Number of Pages: 32 
Price: $2.99
Safety Content Label: Teen

“Denial”

Publisher Blurb:

On the darkest of nights, who is the one person Batman meets that could change his life forever?

Reviewers Comments:

I hope I’m not being too blasphemous in my statement, but Grant Morrison giveth and he taketh away.

Unless you’re one of those few fanboys (or girls) that’s avoided spoilers from Batman, Inc. #8 than you’re one of the few fans out there that has no idea that Damien Wayne has gone the way of the dodo, 30 Rock and the New York Knicks 13-game winning streak. Now, I’ve personally gone on the record and stated my complete and utter admiration for the character of Damien Wayne, and I’ve also enjoyed how the creative team of Tomasi and Gleason have handled the young Wayne and his exploits. Now, with the untimely demise of the fourth Robin (third if you accept that Tim Drake was technically never Robin) I, like other fans of this title, openly wonders the direction of Batman & Robin in the long term.

However in the now, issue #19 of Batman & Red Robin continues to follow a sidekickless Batman. Keeping in lockstep with the silent “Requiem” issue, Bruce Wayne/Batman attempts to deal with a great deal of emotional turmoil, as well as make sense of the death of his only biological son. For a person living under normal circumstances it’s difficult to handle the death of a loved one, so for someone like Batman—a hard case vigilante—this is an experience that can’t be punched, kicked, or elbowed away.

Complicating matters for Bruce Wayne (as the cover suggest), he’s introduced to a young woman in Carrie Kelley (in what can be perceived as in poor taste), with ties to Damien that he as a father (and detective) knew nothing about. As for the Batman, the Dark Knight’s grief manifest itself in actions befitting of a super villain. The desperation of the World’s Greatest Detective reveals a willingness for extreme measures that a character like, Superman, would ever breech in order to resurrect a loved one. It’s also Batman’s borderline criminal behavior which allows for this issues co-star, Red Robin, to seamlessly work his way into the tale. All of this is made possible through the combined might of Tomasi and Patrick Gleason, who’s work over the last several issues remains me of ChrisCross (artist on Blood Syndicate and Captain Marvel).

I’m a huge, huge, Damien Wayne fan, before Damien briefly became Red Bird, before the Robin costume had a hood, around the time the young Wayne beheaded one of Batman’s villains, and much like the Dark Knight, I’m at a complete lost for words. As a fan I’m intrigued by what’s possibly to come. With the debut of Carrie (the Robin from Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns) as well as Harper Row’s recent appearance in Batman #18, there stands a reasonable chance that the next Robin, in all likelihood, will be of the XY chromosome. Unless Batman is successful in bringing Damien from the dead.




Ghost Town #1 Review

Written by on Mar 17, 2013
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews  |  No Comments »

Ghost Town #1

Rating: 2/5
Publisher Name: Action Lab
Publisher Website: www.actionlabcomics.com/danger-zone
Writer: Dave Dwonch
Artist: Justin Greenwood
Colorist: Brian Dyck
Number of Pages: 32
Price: 3.99
Safety Content Label: Mature

 

Publisher Blurb:

Moments after scientists create a time machine, terrorists steal and weaponize the device, sending bombs into the future Las Vegas evaporates in flame as the terrorists reveal their future target: Washington DC. Now, the FBI must find the terrorists before the capital becomes a Ghost Town. The clock is ticking.

Reviewers Comments:

From Action Lab Comics mature line comes, Ghost Town. The five-issue series from writer/creator, Dave Dwonch and Artist Justin Greenwood, is full of action reminiscent those explosive ’80s action films such as Die Hard, Lethal Weapon, Rambo, and (one of my all time favorites) Terminator. Hyperbole aside, is the content of this comic worth the price of admission?

First off, Ghost Town has all the markings of a story tailor made for those with a Jones in their bones for action. Within the first few pages splashed with profanity, full frontal nudity, Boom! head shots and explosions. The story opens with Emil, a young scientists, that works for a company that (as stated in the publisher blurb) creates a working time machine. From that point in the story, things go sideways and FBI is quickly involved. Through very realistic and natural dialogue each of the characters that make an appearance throughout this first issue have their own unique voice.

However, due to the strength of the dialogue, the glancing lack of a true central/lead character both detracts and distracts from the comic. This ultimately leads me to the biggest problem; the troupes strung together throughout this issue. From the terrorist themselves with their motivations and actions, to summer blockbuster style uses of theatrics, Ghost Town #1 doesn’t stray might into the realm of the unexpected.

It’s possible this comic is an assemble piece and that I’m missing the point of where this story is headed. However, the lack of an emotional anchor makes it difficult for readers to connect with this new comic franchise. In the end, I hope that I’m proven wrong and that the by-the-numbers first issue of this five-issue series is simply a hiccup in a tale that takes advantage of no only the last page reveal but the dialogue, artistic direction and the ghost town as well.




Uncanny Avengers #4 Review

Written by on Mar 6, 2013
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews, Marvel Reviews  |  No Comments »

Uncanny Avengers #4

Rating: 4/5
Publisher Name: Marvel Comics
Publisher Website: www.marvel.com
Writers: Rick Remender
Artist: John Cassaday
Colorist: Laura Martin with Larry Molinar
Number of Pages: 22 
Price: $3.99
Safety Content Label: Teen

Publisher’s Blurb:

Red Skull and his S-Men move forward their take over of New York. A member of the Uncanny Avengers joins the S-Men! When the chips are down, the fight all but lost, one Avenger must rise and face the terrible might of The Omega Skull!

Reviewer’s Comments:

Issue #4 is the culmination of the united Avengers first encounter with the Xavier infused Red Skull. And this united team basically get their collective asses kicked. Writer Rick Remender and artist John Cassaday, put these united Avengers through the wringer as the Red Skull, with the aid of his S-Men (and Thor), brings an onslaught of emotional, mental and physical pain down upon this team.

The Red Skull proves to be a formidable opponent for the combined forces of X-Men and Avengers. Although the former Nazi’s plan to wipe the earth of the reborn mutant populace seems simple, it’s decisive: he strikes at the heart of the team members. One particular moment that comes to mind involves long-time enemies Red Skull and Captain America. Without giving away any details, this sequence between the two is a horrifyingly beautiful. Through Remender’s dialogue and Cassaday’s pencils, the Red Skull’s words and utter conviction nearly had me convinced that his cause is just.

Although the action is hard and heavy, it’s the quiet moments where this issues totally shines. This team’s dynamic is the most explosive since possibility the original All-New All-Different X-Men that featured Wolverine, Nightcrawler, Angel and Storm. Although this is a book that is tabbed as the bridge between X-Men and Avengers franchises, the emotion of this series is heavily influences by the soap opera aspect of Marvel’s Merry Mutants.

For instance the tension that resides between Scarlet Witch and Rogue as well as Wolverine’s guilt over Professor X’s death, makes for a few strong reasons to continue to come back month in and month out to Uncanny Avengers. One last thing that I must remake on within the pages of this issue and that relates to the Summers brother origin. Now as a long-time X-Men fan, I’ve read the Scott and Alex Summers parachute story a dozen times, in a dozen different ways; however, I think the opening of Uncanny Avengers #4 is the first time I can remember reading this

In closing, Rick Remender and John Cassaday conclude the first encounter between the united Avengers and the Red Skull in a stunning fashion. Spoiler none withstanding (although there is a hint in the opening paragraph), the stage is set for these combined X-Men and Avengers to not only deepen the connection between their respective franchises with one another but also forge new unexplored ground in within the Marvel Now!

 




Guardians of the Galaxy #0.1 Review Review

Written by on Mar 3, 2013
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews, Marvel Reviews  |  No Comments »

Guardians of the Galaxy #0.1 Review

Rating: 3/5
Publisher Name: Marvel Comics
Publisher Website: www.marvel.com
Writers: Brian Michael Bendis
Artist: Steve McNiven
Colorist: Justin Ponsor
Number of Pages: 32
Price: $3.99
Safety Content Label: Teen

 

Publisher’s Blurb:

Move over Avengers… the Guardians got this. In this special prelude issue meet the man behind the Guardians: Star-Lord… and discover how this child of Earth became the leader of the rag-taggiest of teams in all the Galaxy.

Reviewer’s Comments:

I may have mentioned this a time or two, but my pop’s got me into comics and for that, I thank him. It was my old man who introduced me to such characters as Spider-Man, Batman and yes, Aquaman. However, it was my own curiosity that got me to first purchase a copy of Guardians of the Galaxy (and it also helped there was someone not named Captain America holding his shield). Over time, through my early teens, I was completely hooked to the adventures of Vance Astro, Charlie-27, Martinex and Starhawk. However, like a good things it came to an end (to which I was totally bummed about).

Fast forward to several years back and Marvel decided to give the Guardians of the Galaxy franchise another shot. This version of the book however, featured such characters as Star-Lord, Rocket Raccoon and Gamora. Despite the differences between this iteration and the one I grew up reading, the book’s core has remained the same: guarding the galaxy. All the same, the DnA written series was put on the shelf and as a huge fan I was once again heart broken. After the second cancellation of the series, I honestly thought I’d never see the Guardians again, that’s was until Marvel announced their intentions to release a Guardians movie and new book with Brian Michael Bendis at the helm. So my thought process going into this #0.1 issue is fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me. So what does the thrice time suggest?

Issue #0.1 of Guardians of the Galaxy is a typical Marvel character origin story in every sense of the phrase. In the case of Star-Lord, he’s got all the Marvel origin markers in spades: he’s the bastard child of a ruler of an alien race, his earth mother is murdered by a rival alien race, he’s also got a strong healthy resentment towards his father, and due to tragic events in his life, he is hell bent on protecting others based on that fact. This issue sets up Star-Lord as a sympathetic grounded character with the potential to become a star not only within the Marvel Universe, but the big screen as well (although Rocket Raccoon might have a word about that).

For this introductory issue, artist Steve McNiven, brings his A-game. His pencils are crisp when need to be during the slow emotional moments, like the quiet passion exhibited between Meredith and J’Son (Star-Lord’s parents), to when the script calls for frenetic energy, McNiven delivers. This is a splendid looking book in which I believe that McNiven’s work should only improve as he becomes more familiar with the characters and the Marvel Universe’s universe.

All and all, issue #0.1 is a solid origin story that will help new fans become grounded with Star-Lord (and to a slightly lesser degree the Guardians of the Galaxy) and allow older fan (such as myself) a change to fond over these space faring heroes once again. I say all of that to say that Brian Michael Bendis, through this #0.1, displays the same love and care for this book as much as the fans love and cherish either incarnation of the team.




All New X-Men #1 Review

Written by on Nov 15, 2012
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews, Marvel Reviews  |  1 Comment »

All New X-Men #1

Rating: 4/5
Publisher Name: Marvel Comics
Publisher Website: www.marvel.com
Writers: Brian Michael Bendis
Artist: Stuart Immonen
Colorist: Marte Gracia
Number of Pages: 20
Price: 3.99
Safety Content Label: Teen

 

Publisher’s Blurb:

Marvel Now! The five original X-Men have been plucked from yesteryear and sent to the present. How will they deal with the current state of Xavier’s dream, and how will today’s X-Men cope with facing their former selves?

Reviewer’s Comments:

I grew up a Marvel Comics fanboy. Part of my fascination with the 616 Universe is tied to how my Pops would bash the DC comics from his day. However, despite whatever funny quip would come from Pops, like say, on the subject of Superman’s lame rogue’s gallery, the thing that truly separated DC from Marvel for me: mutants. What can I say, I’m an X-Men junky. When it comes to Marvel’s merry mutants my knowledge is vast. Although Spider-Man and Batman are personal favorites, it’s what made the X-Men ‘different’ that attracted me. The X-Men didn’t received their super human abilities through scientific accidents, alien heritage, or cosmic intervention. Mutants are born not made.

Well, that was the case when mutants were born in the Marvel Universe.

Since House of M, there’s been only a handful of new mutant births. Although I have to admit, I was excited when Wanda uttered the words: “No more mutants.” The decimation of the mutant populace lead to subsequent years of a mere 197 mutants staving off extinction. Yet, fallout from Avengers vs. X-Men, has cleansed the palette of the Marvel Universe and once again springs with the possibility of new mutants.

And in fiction, much like life, past is prologue.

With the inaugural issue of All New X-Men, not only is the appearance of new mutants and X-Men in the cards, but so are older (although younger) versions of X-Men as well. Although this issue is advertised as smashing the original five X-Men–Cyclops, Jean Grey, Beast, Iceman and (useless) Angel—into the present, this story is just as much about the current state of the X-Men. One character that has evolved since Wanda’s magic three words is Cyclops.

Where once I thought of him as a dick who led but wasn’t much of a leader, in the aftermath of Avengers vs. X-Men (and AvX: Consequences) he’s in an intriguing place as a character, that of mutant revolutionary. With the current state of the X-Men, and how the original five X-Men are brought into the story, Bendis and Immonen are laying the groundwork for what could become an epic X-Men tale on par with those stories of my youth.

Although I’m not a huge fan of time travel stories X-Men or otherwise, I was pleasantly surprised by this comic. There are quite a few moving parts within this issue, from what will be the reaction of the original five when they step foot into their future, to the fate of present-day Beast as he deals with physical change, there’s enough within these pages to keep readers salivating at the month as they wait for the second issue. It’s early in the comic’s shelf life, but Bendis and Immonen All New X-Men is a book that definitely has the attention of both adult and prepubescence fanboy me.   




Marceline and The Scream Queens 4 of 6 Review

Written by on Oct 31, 2012
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews  |  No Comments »

Marceline and The Scream Queens 4 of 6

Rating: 4/5

Publisher Name: KaBOOM!

Publisher Website: www.kaboom-studios.com

Writers: Yoko Ota & Ananth Paragariya

Artist: Yoko Ota

Colorist: Lisa Moore

Number of Pages: 32

Price: 3.99

Safety Content Label: All-ages

Publisher’s Blurb:

Don’t miss the latest issue of this popular ADVENTURE TIME spin-off mini-series!Starring fan-favorite Marceline the Vampire Queen and the hit of San Diego Comic-Con.

Reviewer’s Comments:

As an enthusiast of comic books, hip-hop, football, prose, video games, cartoons, MMA, photography, Anime, basketball and movies amongst other things, occasionally something from one of those varying interest groups slips through the cracks. It pains me to say, but other than the Buff Baby clip, I’ve only seen a hand full episodes of Adventure Time. So like anyone seeking knowledge, I went to the experts: Devin (age 9) and Donovan (age 5).

Now for the comic. 

The Adventure Time  spin-off mini-series main story follows Marceline (a guitar playing vampire) and Princess Bubblegum (who is made of bubblegum), two characters that don’t particularly get along as I was told by Devin, as they are off experiencing life without Finn, the star of the Adventure Time cartoon. Now in the information dump that I received about the characters, one thing that bubbled to the surface: friction between characters is a good thing.

Without having a wealth of knowledge on the Adventure Time subject, issue 4 of 6 in this limited series quickly pulled me in with great character moments. There is drama aplenty and action galore from cover-to-cover. From the tension, and eventual resolution, between Marceline and Princess Bubblegum to Finn having an “off day” as well as Peppermint Butler’s borderline villainy in the service of Princess Bubblegum, Marceline and The Scream Queens is a well-rounded all-ages romp through the Adventure Time universe.




Uncanny Avengers #1 Review

Written by on Oct 13, 2012
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews, Marvel Reviews  |  No Comments »

Uncanny Avengers #1

Rating: 4/5

Publisher Name: Marvel Comics

Publisher Website: www.marvel.com

Writer: Rick Remender

Artist: John Cassaday

Colorist: Laura Martin

“New Union”

Publisher’s Blurb:

THIS IS IT! The greatest era of the Marvel Universe starts here! From the ashes of AvX an all-new, all-different Avengers assemble! Captain America begins his quest to create a sanctioned Avengers unit comprised of Avengers and X-Men, humans and mutants working together—so why is Professor Xavier’s dream more at risk than ever? The first attack of the most loathsome villain in history will quake the Marvel Universe forever! The funeral of one of Marvel’s greatest heroes!

Reviewer’s Comments:

Welcome to the Marvel Now! Without revealing anything that my friend Frank has yet to read in regards to the outcome of AvX, Uncanny Avengers is the new flagship title to the Marvel experience. Much like the title suggests, this book combines the might of both mutants and super-powered humans (or demi-God in the case of Thor), and yet another book for Wolverine to run around in, popping his claws, saying bub way too much.

Now as a tried and true graduate of the Xavier School for Gifted Students (I have the diploma to prove it. Thanks Wizard: The Comics Magazine.) one thing that always perturbed me is that if the X-Men and Avengers, co-existed on the same earth, than why in the blue hell didn’t the Avengers (or the Fantastic Four for that matter) ever step up on the behalf of X-Men and in part, the mutant race? That question is in fact the spoon that stirs the drink that is Uncanny Avengers. Rick Remender and John Cassaday’s opening salvo is a lot darker and grotesque in tone than I imaged for a flagship title; however, to anyone that’s reading Remender’s masterful run on Uncanny X-Force knows the devil is in the details, so to speak.

And there are details-a- plenty for Remender to pick and choose from within the tapestry of the Marvel Universe.

For this particular comic, there are issues that stream from “Avengers Disassembled,” “House of M” as well as the recently wrapped AvX that quickly work themselves to the surface of this series. With so many threads to choice from, this book is in Marvel tradition: as conflict and conflicted characters are at the heart of Uncanny Avengers. From the war of words (and eventual fist) between Rogue and Scarlet Witch, to Wolverine (yeah, him again) impassioned and unapologetic address to his grieving extended family, Uncanny Avengers #1 is a gorgeous and enjoyable read, full of drama, suspense, plus a likable realistic characterization of Alex Summers that has the potential of elevating Havok’s stature within Marvel’s ranks.

Uncanny Avengers seems posed for a long and meaningful run as Marvel’s new premium team.Although, I must admit I’m a slight bit biased on the subject. Growing up a fanboy, I gravitated towards team books. I grew up reading the exploits the X-Men and the Vance Astro lead Guardians of the Galaxy (not that I have anything against Starlord or Rocket Raccoon) where dozens appeared often by the dozens. In many ways, the team book concept is much like a kid having a bunch of toys scattered across the living room floor, picking out the best of the best for a battle royale style mash-up where the only rules are there are no rules. The same lack of inside-the-box, rule abiding storytelling seems unlikely for Marvel’s most recent Uncanny endeavor.




The Boys #70 Review

Written by on Sep 8, 2012
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews, Dynamite Entertainment Reviews  |  1 Comment »

The Boys #70

Rating: 4/5

Publisher Name: Dynamite Entertainment

Publisher Website: www.dynamite.net

Writer: Garth Ennis

Artist: Russ Braun

Colorist: Tony Aviña

Number of Pages: 32

Price: 3.99

Safety Content Label: Mature

“The Bloody Doors Off” Part Five

Publisher’s Blurb:

On his own and out of options, Hughie resorts to extreme measures to keep himself in the game. Meanwhile, as vengeful forces close in from all around, Bradley considers a drastic step of her own- but will Stillwell allow her to get away with it? Butcher asks the big questions and Hughie finds out one last secret of his own, as The Bloody Doors Off races towards its fateful conclusion.

Reviewers Comments:

I’ve read a lot of Garth Ennis comics in my day. Probably more than the law allows. From Hellbrazer, to Preacher and even The Authority for good measure and the true of the matter is I’ve digested my share of the Irishman’s stories. However, despite all of that, I find myself surprised that I’m surprised when Ennis writes something in the script that’s off-kilter. Reading a Ennis penned story is akin to listening to Kool Keith.

The Bronx emcee’s discography includes titles such as Dr. Octagonecologyst, Sex Styles and Black Elvis/Lost In Space. Fans and critics of Kool Keith would agree his lyrics are often abstract, surreal, filled with juvenile humor and his graphic style leads to sexual themes as naturally as the word ‘arse’ is in an Ennis comic. After further review, I wouldn’t be surprised if the Hitman scribe of and Ultramagnetic MCs alum are one in the same.

Anyway, the point of the diatribe is that too much Ennis—or Kool Keith for that matter—can lead to mental rot. Like say, quoting from either artist in social setting: baby shower, in front of significant others mother’s, remotely anywhere in the vicinity of a church, mosque, temple, synagogue…

As unforeseen as Kool Keith and Ice-T collaborating on an album, Ennis and artist, Russ Braun’s, picks up issue #70 moments after the “explosive” ending of the previous issue. In the penultimate of “The Bloody Doors Off”, the CIA-backed team is now a one-man operation. Wee Hughie has a few decisions to make which leads to a few places that are hmm… questionable… in a good way?

Issue #70 has one of those Dear-Lord-why-am-I-reading-this-comic-on-a-packed-bus-while-sitting-next-to-an-elder-woman-while-going-to-work moments, as there is the first time meeting between Wee Hughie and Mrs. Milk. To say exactly what transpires between the two would spoil the fun in finding out for yourself… and I’ll leave it at that.

Aside from a few things that should be talked about in small huddles, away from minors, issue #70 finally pits Wee Hughie and Billy Butcher. It would seem that since the series inception, this moment has been bubbling under the surface. If I had one wish, the former friends would have kicked, bit and punched a bit more.

Overall, issue #70 of The Boys continues the tradition of Garth Ennis shock and awe that includes a few uncomfortable laughs thrown in for good measure. If I weren’t already fully invested in the series before, this particular issue–which outs Butcher as a logically flawed sympathetic villain–makes a strong case for re-read. I shutter to think of what may occur in next month’s swan song for “The Bloody Doors Off”, but as long as Garth Ennis is at the helm, we all can expect something that would make Kool Keith proud.

 




Princeless #1 Review

Written by on Sep 3, 2012
Filed in: Comic Book Reviews  |  No Comments »

Princeless #1

Rating: 5/5

Publisher Name: Action Lab

Publisher Website: www.actionlabcomics.com

Writer: Jeremy Whitley

Artist/Colorist: M. Goodwin

Number of Pages: 28

Price: 3.99

Safety Content Label: All Ages

 

Publisher Blurb:

Still waiting for your prince to come? Tired of spending night after night locked in a secluded tower? Ready for your own adventure? So are we.

Reviewers Comments:

Like many people, I too, grew up with my fair share of the Disney version of fairy-tales. From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to Sleeping Beauty despite the different story titles and princess’ hair color, these stories are essentially the same damsel in distress tale. With that in mind, Princeless is a breath of fresh air as it takes the idea of a damsel in distress and turns it on it’s ear.

Jeremy Whitley and M. Goodwin do a tremendous job of introducing the character of Adrienne, an intelligent, strong-willed sixteen year-old princess that’s more than inclined to fight oppression. The seed of Adrienne’s resistance is planted early in the comic as a young Adrienne rips apart a fairy tale involving a “beautiful blonde-haired, blue-eyed princess” locked away in the “tallest of tall towers.” From this early conversation between mother and daughter about what’s wrong in these fairy-tales it’s clear that Princeless is going to go out of it’s way to buck the trend of talking woodland creatures, accidental curses, and musical numbers.

Although Adrienne is the protagonist of the comic and thus the bulk of page and panel space is allotted towards her character development, this first issue regardless is well-paced. By the end of the issue the central plot, theme and potential antagonist are all established. Princeless does what any great piece of fiction does, it introduces a world and situation full of conflict that is equal parts memorable and inventive. Through the lens of Adrienne, the world of Princeless takes shape in a meaningful way that begs for further investigation.

Princeless is a story that borrows elements of the tried and true fairy-tale and adds a much needed modern spin. Where fairy-tales of the past relied on an out dated formula of “sitting and waiting,” the team of Jeremy Whitley and M. Goodwin instead embark on a tale that asks, ‘why wait for someone else to come rescue you when you can save yourself?’ Issue one of Princeless is only the tip of the iceberg in terms of answering that question, but if future issues are of this quality tn Adrienne and readers can expect the unexpected.


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